Theropod teeth from the Upper Cretaceous of the State of Coahuila, Mexico

  • Esperanza Torres-Rodríguez Posgrado en Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, 04510 México, D.F., México.
  • Marisol Montellano-Ballesteros Departamento de Paleontología, Instituto de Geología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Cd. Universitaria, Del. Coyoacán, 04510 México, D. F., México.
  • René Hernández-Rivera Departamento de Paleontología, Instituto de Geología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Cd. Universitaria, Del. Coyoacán, 04510 México, D. F., México.
  • Mouloud Benammi Institut International de Paléoprimatologie, Paléontologie Humaine: Evolution et Paléoenvironnements (IPHEP)-UMR CNRS 6046,SFA-Université de Poitiers, Bât. de Sciences Naturelles (3ème étage), 40 avenue du Recteur Pineau, F86022 Poitiers Cedex, Francia.
Keywords: paleobiogeography, dinosaurs, teeth, Theropoda, Late Cretaceous, Aguja Formation, Olmos Formation, Mexico.

Abstract

In Mexico, the theropods represents a poorly known group of dinosaurs, the scarce material had been referred only to “family” level. As a result of paleontological research carried on in the State of Coahuila, dental remains belonging to theropods were recovered. The identified genera are Saurornitholestes, cf. Troodon, as well as Tyrannosauridae and an indeterminate theropod. The theropod diversity of Coahuila is similar to that described for the Big Bend National Park, Texas, confirming the existence of a distinct dinosaurian biogeographic province in the southern Great Plains of North America. If the presence of Troodon at this latitude is confirmed, it would suggest that the geographic distribution of this theropod genus was much wider than previously supposed.

Published
2017-12-13
Section
Articles