Paragenesis of alkaline zeolite in an outcrop of amigdaloidal olivine basalts in Junín de Los Andes, Neuquén, Patagonia, Argentina

  • María E. Vattuone Cátedra de Mineralogía, Departamento de Ciencias Geológicas, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires, C1428EHA, Argentina. Instituto de Geocronología y Geología Isotópica (INGEIS) – Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires, Argentina.
  • Pablo R. Leal Cátedra de Mineralogía, Departamento de Ciencias Geológicas, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires, C1428EHA, Argentina. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • Sabrina Crosta Servicio Geológico Minero Argentino (SEGEMAR). Av. Julio Argentino Roca 651, Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires, C1067ABB, Argentina.
  • Yanina Berbeglia Cátedra de Mineralogía, Departamento de Ciencias Geológicas, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires, C1428EHA, Argentina.
  • Ernesto Gallegos Cátedra de Mineralogía, Departamento de Ciencias Geológicas, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires, C1428EHA, Argentina.
  • Carmen Martínez-Dopico Cátedra de Mineralogía, Departamento de Ciencias Geológicas, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires, C1428EHA, Argentina.
Keywords: alkaline zeolites, basalts, Junín de Los Andes, Patagonia.

Abstract

 

The optical characteristics, X-ray diffraction, unit cell, chemistry and crystallization conditions of an alkaline zeolite assemblage were studied. The zeolites have been found infilling amygdales and in the matrix of Tertiary olivine basalts from Junin de los Andes, Patagonia. The secondary minerals (albite, pumpellyite, interestratified chlorite/smectite (C/S), smectite, iddingsite, magnetite and hematite) are replacing phenocrysts of plagioclase, olivine and the matrix of the rocks. Zeolites are sodic, calco-sodic and potassic in composition. Na–chabazite, analcime, Ca-K phillipsite and paulingite are the first zeolites that crystallized. They were followed by acicular-fibrous zeolites as natrolite/Na-gonnardite, thomsonite, mesolite and scolecite. The formation of the first zeolites is consistent with low temperature (<100 ºC), low pressure (<0.1 GPa) and alkaline (pH 9–10) hydrothermal/geothermal meteoric fluids, which were favored by tensional fractures. The activity of Si decreased during the alteration process and the temperature increased toward 200 ºC allowing the analcime formation followed by the equilibrium assemblage natrolite/Na-gonnardite-thomsonite-scolecite and mesolite.

 

Published
2018-01-22
Section
Articles